Beginner's Guide to Judo

Many people will have seen judo at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, where Gemma Gibbons and Sam Ingram won silver with Karina Bryant and Ben Quilter taking bronze.

 

It is an exciting sport, where a split-second can mean victory or defeat as athletes aiming to score the ultimate ippon. Scores can be registered for throws, holding techniques or strangling techniques, whilst penalties are given to the athletes for breaking rules.

 

Judo contests see two athletes compete on each tatami (mat), one in a white judogi (judo suit) and the second in a blue judogi.
The referee will then ask the athletes on to the tatami. The athletes will bow as they enter the tatami and the referee will call hajime (begin) to start the contest. During the contest the referee will stop the contest with the word matte(stop) when matte is called the contest time clock will stop and starts when hajime (begin) is called. The contest last for five minutes and if score are level at the end of this period, the contest enters golden score.

 

Ippon

Ippon is the biggest score in judo and scoring it ends the contest. It is shown on the scoreboard as 100.

Ippon can be scored in one of four ways:

  1. Throwing your opponent largely on their back with considerable force and speed.
  2. Holding down your opponent with Osaekomi waza (holding techniques), who is unable to escape for 20 seconds.
  3. When your opponent submits tapping twice or more with their hand or foot or say maitti (I give up) as a result of osaekomi waza (holding techniques), shime waza ( chocking or strangling techniques) or kansetsu waza (arm locks).
  4. Scoring two waza-ari against your opponent.

Waza-ari

A waza-ari is shown on the scoreboard as a score of 10 and can be scored in two ways:

  1. Throwing your opponent but lacking one of the three elements for ippon - largely on their back or with force and speed.
  2. Holding down your opponent for 15 seconds or more, but less than 20 seconds.

 

Yuko

A yuko is shown on the scoreboard as a score of 1 and can be scored in two ways:

  1. Throwing your opponent but lacking two of the three elements for ippon - largely on their back or with force and speed.
  2. Holding down your opponent for 10 seconds but less than 15 seconds.

 

Shido

Shido are penalty scores. There are numerous ways to collect Shido. An athlete can get a shido from not taking grip (kumi-kata) and not attacking to disregarding the referee. At the end of normal time in the contest, the player with the fewest shido will be declared the winner

 

Hansoku-Make (Disqualification)

An athlete will get Hansoku-Make if they are awarded four shidos or by committing a serious offence. Again there are numerous ways to get Hansoku-Make. These include all grips below the belt, all type of leg grabs and any action against the spirit of judo.

 

Golden Score (Extra Time)

There is no time limit to golden score, if the contest continues into Golden Score (due to a draw) after the allocated time. The first receiving a shido loses the contest or the first to score with a technique will win the contest.

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Welsh Judo Association

Sport Wales National Centre

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CF11 9SW

 

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